Sunday, September 06, 2009

First public display of the DH-10 (EastSea 10) land-attack cruise missile (LACM).

The DH-10 LACM was on display for the first time during last night's rehearse for the PRC's 60th anniversary of the nation's founding near Tiananmen square.

This secretive project was first reported in 2004 and according to the 2008 edition of the "Military Power of the People's Republic of China" (here) the 2nd Artillery Corps has an estimated 50 to 250 missiles with about 20 to 30 launchers under its command.

The DH-10 LACM has an estimated range of more than 1,500km and likely to be equipped with an integrated inertial navigation system/Global Positioning System, supplemented by a terrain contour mapping system and digital scene-matching terminal-homing system able to provide a circular error probable (CEP) of 10m.

Together with YJ-63, they formed the PLA's "stand-off, precision strike" package against high value targets -- a capability that was inspired by the US's success in the recent Gulf Wars.











14 comments:

Anonymous said...

Is this the same as Babur exported to Pakistan violating MTCR.

RAJ47 said...

DongHai-10 is East Sea 10 and not Long Sword. LongSword would be ChangJian.

duskylim said...

Finally official confirmation along with the containers and launch vehicles of China's DH-10 land-attack cruise missile system.

I believe Anonymous is correct in assuming that this is the same 'Babur' missile exported to Pakistan some years ago.

If that is indeed the case, this missile has been deployed and operational for a number of years now, meaning improved, longer-ranged and more accurate and models must be in the works.

Although it is frustrating for us observers, China's strategy of only officially confirming the existence of any weapons system when it suites her makes things very difficult for any potential opponent as one never knows exactly what weapons may be used against you.

MJ said...

I hop this will clear everythinkg up

JANE'S DEFENCE WEEKLY - AUGUST 12, 2005
PAKISTAN TESTS CRUISE MISSILE
Robert Hewson, Editor, Jane's Air-Launched Weapons and
Andrew Koch JDW Bureau Chief

The Pakistani Babur cruise missile seems to share several basic similarities with the US BGM-109 Tomahawk . Pakistan's ultimate aim may be to field this weapon on its Agosta-class submarines Pakistan has made public the first test launch of a new cruise missile system, the Babur (also known as the Hatf-VII), which was successfully flight-tested on 11 August. The launch is a significant step forward for its strategic arsenal. Major General Shaukat Sultan, the Pakistan Army's chief spokesman, said that the weapon has a 500 km range and can be fitted with either a conventional or nuclear warhead. The Babur is described as a high-speed, low-level terrain-following missile, but Shaukat declined to provide specifics on its guidance or propulsion system. Neither is its payload capability known. Film footage of the test launch shows the Babur being fired from a transporter erector launcher (TEL) by a solid rocket booster fitted to the missile's tail section. The booster drops away after a short initial phase and the missile transitions into forward flight with the deployment of pop-out wings and a ventral air intake for the main engine. It is unclear whether the engine is a turbofan or turbojet power plant. However, in 2002 Pakistan announced development of a turbojet-powered aerial target called the Nishan-Mk 2TJ that analysts viewed as a preliminary step to developing a cruise missile.

MJ said...

The Babur test firing occurred at a previously undisclosed test range, Maj Gen Shaukat confirmed to JDW. This is understood to be located along the Baluchistan coast. A US intelligence official noted that additional tests are expected to be conducted using that area. Pakistani scientist Samar Mubarak Mund, who heads the National Engineering and Scientific Commission that led the Babur programme, told the Pakistani newspaper The News that production of the missile would begin within a month. The Babur appears to share several basic similarities with the US BGM-109 Tomahawk land attack cruise missile, with the two being roughly the same size and shape and having a similar wing and engine intake design. A Pakistani source with knowledge of the programme said the project began around 1998 and was bolstered by lessons learned from Tomahawk missiles recovered in Pakistan. These US Tomahawks had failed to reach intended targets in an August 1998 strike against a terrorist camp in Afghanistan; Pakistani officials at the time acknowledged that they had recovered at least two missiles. "I'm sure they must have learned from that ... they are quite good in reverse engineering," the source noted. Ultimately, Pakistani officials said, the Babur is being developed for land- and submarine-launched applications, with a longer-term goal of making it suitable for airborne launch. The Pakistani source said that the intention is to have the Babur deployable on the country's French-designed Agosta 90-class attack submarines, although he noted it does not appear the missile is small enough to fit into 533 mm torpedo tubes in its current configuration. The Babur's vertical launch mode also points to a possible ship-board configuration, which would be an obvious first step for such a missile. The first reports of a possible Pakistan cruise missile emerged in mid-2004 when a test was predicted before the end of that year. None occurred, but just days before the 2005 launch Pakistani President General Pervez Musharraf predicted that more missile tests would be undertaken soon. At the same time Pakistani officials were reported to be working on a new nuclear missile system that would be tested in the near future. General Musharraf said that the Babur test was a "major milestone" in Pakistan's nuclear programme. According to one high-ranking military source within Pakistan's Joint Staff HQ, the Babur "is an indigenous cruise missile that has been developed and produced in Pakistan", adding that the missile design "has no 'lineage' as such". In a related development, JDW has learned that Pakistan is actively negotiating with China and France for the purchase of two or three new submarines. These same sources say that Islamabad aims to develop its first submarine-launched ballistic missile by 2006.A senior Pakistani official told JDW that "expansion of our submarine fleet" represents the next stage in the development of Pakistan's strategic weapon capability. The navy will have nine submarines following the induction by next year of the last of three Agosta submarines acquired from France. Source: Janes Defence

MJ said...

Pakistani Babur cruise missile is based on the US BGM-109 Tomahawk which were recovered in Pakistan. These US Tomahawks had failed to reach intended targets in an August 1998 strike against a terrorist camp in Afghanistan; Pakistani officials at the time acknowledged that they had recovered at least two missiles.

Coatepeque said...

DongHai-10 is East Sea 10 and not Long Sword. LongSword would be ChangJian.

Thanks, Corrected.

Coatepeque said...

No Babur has a range 600KM while DH-10 has a range of 1500km

Sean O'Connor said...

The second to last image, of the missile hanging from a ceiling, is actually a Tomahawk hanging from the ceiling in the USAF Museum. It's hanging with an AGM-129 and an AGM-86B. It's amusing that the image keeps making the rounds as a DH-10.

Coatepeque said...

Thanks Sean, I will remove it.

duskylim said...

While Pakistan has many people of talent and skill, both in the technical and engineering fields (like the Nobel Physics Prize winner Dr. Abdus Salam - whom I met here in the Philippines) , I do not remember any time when she demonstrated an indigenously-designed mini turbo-jet or turbo-fan engine suitable for powering cruise missiles such as the Babur.

Indeed, I do not recall any Pakistani-developed jet engine ever being displayed.

This being the heart of the cruise missile, without which it could NOT be made, suggests that it must get them from an outside source.

And if during the critical period of development of this missile (in fact concurrently with many other 'indigenous' ballistic missiles) Pakistan was subject to an international arms embargo (due to their response to the Indian Pokhran nuclear tests with their own at Chagai) then Pakistan is to be warmly congratulated in achieving what India with its greater monetary, technical and human resources could not do alone (or at least without Russian assistance) - not just the development of the Babur cruise missile, but also several classes of solid-propellant surface-to-surface missiles.

If your assertions are correct, only two conclusions can be drawn.

1) Pakistan was able to clandestinely develop an indigenous gas-turbine engine manufacturing capability without out anyone's knowledge or,

2) Perhaps the West was being deliberately hypocritical and was supplying missile components to Pakistan while claiming to adhere to it's own MTCR - Missile Technology Control Regime based embargo.

And all this despite Western knowledge that Pakistan's ISI (Inter-Services Intelligence) was complicit if not key in the establishment and support of the Taliban and therefore NOT a dis-interested Islamic party and an unreliable strategic partner.

The Pakistani military makes many claims, the question is whether to believe them or not.

In the manufacture and repair aircraft, Pakistan relies on the Chinese funded and equipped - PAC - Pakistani Aeronautical Complex at Kamra; to make tanks, artillery and armoured vehicles, it relies on a similarly Chinese-supplied facility - HIT - Heavy Industries Taxila.

Even in the manufacture of ammunition it uses a Chinese-supplied factory - from which during the term of our ex-President Joseph Estrada, the Philippine Army purchased 105 mm howitzer ammunition.

The purpose of your post was clearly to DENY any possibility of Chinese assistance in the development of the Babur cruise missile, and yet despite this 'supposed' capability Pakistan still orders a very similar missile the C-802 (YJ-82) missile from China.

And the fact that the DH-10 (or whatever its official name is) has a longer range is more likely due to longer fuel tanks rather than anything else.

In fact what is most probable is that the Pakistani military sent the recovered Tomahawks to China to be reverse-engineered.

Anonymous said...

The purpose of your post was clearly to DENY any possibility of Chinese assistance in the development of the Babur cruise missile, and yet despite this 'supposed' capability Pakistan still orders a very similar missile the C-802 (YJ-82) missile from China.

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Wakeup
One is 120 to 180km range antiship missile and other is long range land attack cruise missile

Just because every thing is not put on the internet don’t mean that it don’t exist.

You have no proof to link the Babur GLCM with china other then saying that no informatin was made available to you ;)

Anonymous said...

And the fact that the DH-10 (or whatever its official name is) has a longer range is more likely due to longer fuel tanks rather than anything else.

In fact what is most probable is that the Pakistani military sent the recovered Tomahawks to China to be reverse-engineered.

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If china had reverse-engineered the Tomahawks provided by Pakistanis, both Pakistani and Chinese missile would same range.


Range difference can be easily explained by the difference in level of technical expertise available in china and Pakistan

Anonymous said...

2) Perhaps the West was being deliberately hypocritical and was supplying missile components to Pakistan while claiming to adhere to it's own MTCR - Missile Technology Control Regime based embargo.


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Oh yeh you are correct whole world is part of this conspiracy against India and they are comfortable in Pakistan having weapons like LACMs. Stop this nonsense argument unless you can active proof that missile is indeed imported from china not the super conspiracy theories